Home Improvement Ideas > Chimney > Hyperbole In The Chimney Sweeper

Hyperbole In The Chimney Sweeper



Hyperbole In The Chimney Sweeper

In a poem called "The Chimney Sweeper" we expect to meet a sweeper. In fact, we meet several (at least five) specific ones, thousands of other nameless ones, .
It's kind of surprising but there's a lot of music in this sad poem. We have two references to "notes of woe," and in the last stanza the chimney sweeper says he is .
Motif: Blake uses the classic literary motif of black and white to convey the chimney sweepers' innocence and experience. This motif is most notably seen in .
In William Blake's poem, "The Chimney Sweeper," the metaphor of the "coffins of black" can be seen to represent innocence. This can be justified by the fact that .
The figures of speech are: Alliteration, Anaphora, Assonance,Euphemis, Hyperbole, Irony, Metaphor,. How much did a Victorian chimney sweeper get paid?



 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *